How to Make Homemade Eggshell Chalk Facebook Post Image

How to Make Homemade Eggshell Chalk

This super easy tutorial to make homemade eggshell chalk turns waste into something wonderful!

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Making Eggshell Chalk is Easy and Fun

I must admit, I had my doubts about this project. But I’m happy to report that I was pleasantly surprised, and this homemade sidewalk chalk recipe is a keeper!

This method produced sturdy, vibrant sidewalk chalk that is easy to use. 

And the best part is that it is super easy and only uses a handful of ingredients. 

The only items you need to make chalk with eggshells are flour, water, food coloring and, of course, eggshells. That’s it! All things that most of us have in our cabinets already.

And because there aren’t any complicated processes involved, this homemade eggshell chalk is perfect for kids to make. Just clean, crush, mix, form and dry. Simple as that!

Making the homemade sidewalk chalk is only half the fun. Kids will get a kick out of creating masterpieces with chalk they made themselves. There’s truly a unique sense of pride that comes with making something with our own two hands!

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Overhead Close Up of 4 Pieces of Egg Shell Chalk in Terracotta Pot Next To Other Pieces of Chalk

Making Homemade Eggshell Chalk is a Great STEAM Activity

Making homemade sidewalk chalk definitely fits into the fun category, but it also offers a great opportunity to naturally incorporate learning.

As you’re working with your little ones on making sidewalk chalk, try sharing some tidbits of information that relate to the activity. 

For example, while there are numerous ingredients found in store-bought sidewalk chalk, the main ingredient is calcium carbonate. 

It just so happens that eggshells also boast an abundance of calcium carbonate. In fact, roughly 95% of the eggshell is calcium carbonate making it an ideal ingredient in homemade sidewalk chalk. 

They are sure to be impressed with your vast knowledge when you share this with them!

You can also try asking your kids what they observe through the process. For example, my girls noticed that the eggshells produced a very distinct odor as they baked in the oven. 

Some other potential prompts are:

  • What happens when the flour and water are mixed together? 
  • How does the chalk change each day of the drying process? 
  • What happens when you mix red and blue food coloring?
  • What changes occur throughout the process? Are they chemical or physical changes?

This project also offers an opportunity to discuss concepts such as upcycling, sustainability and being environmentally friendly in a way that isn’t overwhelming or preachy. 

Kids are naturally curious beings, and it’s amazing what just a little bit of prompting yields in terms of nurturing an appetite for learning!

Method

Begin by thoroughly cleaning your eggshells. You can simply give them a rinse, but since I made so much chalk at one time (and I wanted to make sure they didn’t get stinky), I elected to boil the eggshells in a medium saucepan

Once they come to a boil, reduce the heat and allow to simmer for about 10 minutes. Remove the eggshells to a parchment-lined baking sheet and allow them to dry thoroughly.

To dry, you can place them in direct sunlight for several hours or place them in a 200-degree Fahrenheit oven for 60 minutes.

Overhead Close Up of Egg Shells In Glass Bowl Next To Bowls of Flour and Water and Food Coloring Via and Tea Towel
Overhead Close Up of Egg Shells In Saucepan of Water Next To Other Ingredients For Egg Shell Chalk
Clean Egg Shells On Baking Sheet After Drying In Oven. Glass Bowls and Tea Towel Scattered Around.

Next, grind down the eggshells. You can do this with a rolling pin, mortar and pestle, blender or food processor. I like using a coffee grinder because I find it produces the finest consistency. 

I then sift the eggshells. Now, this part is optional, but I found that using the eggshells in their finest form produces more uniform chalk. I also think they draw more smoothly and are less crumbly by sifting out the larger bits. 

Next, mix 1 teaspoon of flour with 1 teaspoon of hot water until a paste is formed. 

Then add 1 tablespoon of eggshell powder and mix thoroughly to combine.

Overhead Shot of Someone Holding a Coffee Grinder Full of Egg Shells. Pan of Eggshells and Other Bowls In Background.
Overhead Shot of Ground Egg Shell in Coffee Grinder Over Pan of Egg Shells
Overhead View of Flour and Water Mixed In Bowl Surrounded By Other Bowls and Food Coloring.
Overhead View of Partially Mixed Ground Egg Shell With Water and Flour. Surrounded By Other Bowls

Add food coloring of choice and mix well to combine. To achieve vibrant colors, I added about 5 drops of food coloring to each piece of chalk. 

Using your hands, pack tightly into a log shape. 

Roll chalk into a paper towel and let sit for 3-5 days. 

You can reduce drying time by partially baking in the oven. To par-bake, skip rolling into a paper towel and instead place on a parchment-lined baking sheet and dry in a 150-degree Fahrenheit oven for 60-90 minutes. 

Remove from oven and sit out for 1-2 days to allow chalk to fully dry and harden.

Overhead Close Up Of Bowl With Egg Shell Paste and Red Food Coloring Surrounded By Other Bowls
Overhead Shot of Egg Shell Chalk Of Different Colors Formed Into Chalk Shape On Cookie Sheet
Overhead View of Someone Rolling a Red Piece of Egg Shell Chalk Up in A Paper Towel to Dry
Overhead Shot of 12 Pieces of Eggshell Chalk In 2 Rows of 6 Placed Evenly On Landscaping Stone

Tips and Tricks

  • Please be advised that homemade eggshell chalk should not be used on chalkboards. Even after grinding down the eggshells, this chalk is still abrasive enough to cause damage. 
  • It takes about 6-8 large eggshells to produce 1 tablespoon of eggshell powder. 
  • It’s not necessarily practical to make just one piece of chalk at a time. To make a larger batch, just stick with the ratio as follows: 1 tablespoon of eggshell powder for every teaspoon of flour and water. Once you’ve mixed everything, divide into different bowls so you can make each a different color.
  • If you boil your eggshells to clean, don’t throw out the water! Allow to cool and water your plants for a boost of calcium.
  • To prevent staining hands, wear gloves when shaping your chalk pieces.
  • If your eggshell mixture isn’t holding its shape while forming, try adding a touch more water. 
  • Get even more creative by pressing your eggshell mixture into silicone molds for fun-shaped chalk.
Overhead View of The Words Eggshell Chalk Written Out Using Eggshell Chalk Surrounded By Pieces of Chalk
Sidewalk Art Of Red Barn In Field of Flowers With White Clouds, Blue Sky and Yellow Sun Made With Eggshell Chalk
Overhead View Of Rainbow Drawn Using Eggshell Chalk. Surrounded By Pieces of Chalk
Overhead View of 3 Flowers Drawn With Eggshell Chalk. One White Flower, One Pink and One Purple

Consider Some of These Other Practical, Eco-Friendly Uses for Eggshells

  • Use to start seeds – Instead of starting your seeds in plastic pots or peat pots, try using clean eggshells. Since eggshells are biodegradable, you can transplant the entire plant – shell and all – to the garden when the time comes. 
  • Add to your compost bin – Eggshells add much-needed calcium and other important minerals to soil. 
  • Scatter around your garden – Crushed eggshells naturally help deter deer and plant-eating insects from eating up your garden.
  • Use for cleaning – Got a moldy vase? Add some crushed eggshells along with some soapy water and swirl it around. The eggshells act as a natural abrasive for hard-to-reach areas.
Angled View of Eggshell Sidewalk Chalk Evenly Spaced With Brown Dog In Background

Homemade Eggshell Chalk

This super easy tutorial to make homemade eggshell chalk turns waste into something wonderful!
Prep Time30 mins
Dry Time5 d
Total Time5 d 30 mins
Keyword: Easy DIY, Eggshell Chalk, Kid-Friendly, Sidewalk Chalk, STEAM Activity
Yield: 1 piece of chalk

Materials

  • 1 tbsp eggshell powder
  • 1 tsp all-purpose flour
  • 1 tsp hot water
  • 5 drops food coloring of choice

Instructions

  • Begin by thoroughly cleaning your eggshells. You can simply give them a rinse, but since I made so much chalk at one time (and I wanted to make sure they didn’t get stinky), I elected to boil the eggshells in a medium saucepan.
  • Once they come to a boil, reduce the heat and allow to simmer for about 10 minutes. Remove the eggshells to a parchment-lined baking sheet and allow them to dry thoroughly.
  • To dry, you can place them in direct sunlight for several hours or place them in a 200-degree Fahrenheit oven for 60 minutes.
  • Next, grind down the eggshells. You can do this with a rolling pin, mortar and pestle, blender or food processor. I like using a coffee grinder because I find it produces the finest consistency.
  • I then sift the eggshells. Now, this part is optional, but I found that using the eggshells in their finest form produces more uniform chalk. I also think they draw more smoothly and are less crumbly by sifting out the larger bits.
  • Next, mix 1 teaspoon of flour with 1 teaspoon of hot water until a paste is formed.
  • Then add 1 tablespoon of eggshell powder and mix thoroughly to combine.
  • Add food coloring of choice and mix well to combine.
  • Using your hands, pack tightly into a log shape.
  • Roll chalk into a paper towel and let sit for 3-5 days.
  • You can reduce drying time by partially baking in the oven. To par-bake, skip rolling into a paper towel and instead place on a parchment-lined baking sheet and dry in a 150-degree Fahrenheit oven for 60-90 minutes. Remove from oven and sit out for 1-2 days to allow chalk to fully dry and harden.

Notes

  • Please be advised that homemade eggshell chalk should not be used on chalkboards. Even after grinding down the eggshells, this chalk is still abrasive enough to cause damage.
  • It’s not necessarily practical to make just one piece of chalk at a time. To make a larger batch, just stick with the ratio as follows: 1 tablespoon of eggshell powder for every teaspoon of flour and water. Once you’ve mixed everything, divide into different bowls so you can make each a different color.
  • To prevent staining hands, wear gloves when shaping your chalk pieces.
  • If your eggshell mixture isn’t holding its shape while forming, try adding a touch more water. 
  • Get even more creative by pressing your eggshell mixture into silicone molds for fun-shaped chalk.
How to Make Homemade Eggshell Chalk Pinterest Image

Have you ever heard of making sidewalk chalk with eggshells?

Be sure to save this post so you can give it a try next time you make a frittata 😉 

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Christine
2 months ago

Great Post! This is the first time I’ve heard of making chalk with eggshells. I like how you broke down the process step-by-step with photos. The girls must have had a great time learning how to create these and other eco-friendly uses for eggshells.

Karen Kasberg
2 months ago

Very interesting post! I had no idea eggshells could be used to make chalk. What a great craft to do with the kiddos! Thanks for sharing!