Several Beeswax Wraps Hanging From Clothesline.

How To Make Homemade Beeswax Wraps

Beeswax wraps are a great eco-friendly alternative to cling wrap and plastic baggies. However, they can be rather spendy to purchase. With this homemade beeswax wrap DIY, you can create a natural, food-safe product that you can feel good about. 

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Beeswax Wraps Can Prolong The Life Of Your Food

Not only do beeswax wraps cut down on plastic usage, but they also assist in reducing unnecessary food waste by prolonging the life of the food stored in them. 

Beeswax is naturally antimicrobial and antibacterial. Additionally, beeswax allows breathability, extending the freshness of food. 

Jojoba also shows antimicrobial properties which is one of the reasons it is in so many skincare products. 

Pine rosin is believed to act as an antiseptic*Interesting fact: Trees naturally produce resin (a precursor to rosin) in response to damage or injury. The resin creates a protective barrier preventing insects and bacteria from infecting the tree through the wounded area. It is also thought that the resin works to speed up the healing process. Nature is truly amazing!

These elements make a pretty powerful bacteria-fighting team. Think of them like the Avengers of food waste. They’re each pretty bad-ass in their own right, but when you bring them together they perform on a whole other level. So even if making homemade beeswax wraps isn’t your jam, it’s worth checking out some to purchase such as these

Avengers, assemble!

Bowl Covered With Beeswax Wrap In Front Of Another Bowl Covered With Beeswax Wrap.

Supplies For Making Homemade Beeswax Wraps

  • 100% cotton fabric – I used quilting squares that I had leftover from previous projects, and they worked like a charm. This is also a great way to upcycle an outdated or ill-fitting t-shirt.
  • Pine rosin – I went with a powdered version to speed up the melting process.
  • Aluminum can – This is to melt the beeswax mixture in. You won’t be able to clean the waxy residue out of the vessel you choose for melting, so make sure it is something you’re okay to part with. I keep a dedicated can solely for melting wax. I, apparently, melt a fair amount of wax 😉 
  • Skewer or popsicle stick – This is for stirring your melting mixture so don’t use the heirloom silver spoon passed down from Paul Revere. 
  • Paintbrush – Yup, you guessed it. This guy will become your wax-only paintbrush when you’re done. 
  • Pinking shears – This is optional, but they will help to keep your wraps from fraying.
Supplies For Beeswax Wraps - Beeswax Pellets, Jojoba Oil, Pine Resin and Pinking Shears.

Making Homemade Beeswax Wraps

Disclaimer: Please endeavor to work safely when making homemade beeswax wraps. Both beeswax and pine rosin are highly flammable, and should not be left unattended. Adequate precautions should be taken to prevent fires and burns.

Begin by washing and drying the cotton fabric. Cut into the desired sizes and shapes with pinking shears. A lot of wraps are square, but I cut mine into rectangles because it naturally worked out well with the fabric I used. 

I like to prep my fabric pieces by laying out an old towel, placing parchment paper on top of it, then my fabric. It’s also a good idea to lay newspaper out around your work area in case of spills.

Three Different Sizes Of Fabric Cut For Beeswax Wraps With Pinking Shears.

Add the beeswax, jojoba oil and pine rosin to the aluminum can. Fill your saucepan about halfway with water, place the can in the saucepan to create a double boiler. Heat until you reach a steady simmer. 

Allow the beeswax mixture to melt, stirring consistently with a skewer or popsicle stick. The pine resin takes a bit to melt, so this part requires some patience. I recommend staying very close to the mixture as you wait for it to melt to ensure the can doesn’t tip over as the ingredients are flammable. Safety first!

Someone Applying Beeswax Mixture To Fabric With Paintbrush. Next to Other Swatches of Fabric.

Once your mixture has melted together, carefully remove from heat and apply the mixture to your prepared wraps with an old paintbrush working from the center and brushing out toward the edges.

You’ll want to completely cover your fabric with the mixture but not saturate it.

Then place another piece of parchment paper on top of the fabric and iron. Allow to cool for about a minute, then remove the top layer of parchment and peel the fabric from the bottom layer of parchment. Hang to finish drying.

If there are bare spots after ironing, paint some more of the beeswax mixture on the fabric and repeat the ironing process. 

Voila! Homemade, eco-friendly, biodegradable beeswax wraps!

Someone Ironing Beeswax Wrap With Jojaba Oil, Tin Can and Pinking Shears in Background.
Someone Pulling Top Layer Of Parchment Away From Beeswax Wrap.
Beeswax Wrap Laid Flat Ready to Be Folded Into Snack Pouch.

If you enjoy making beeswax wraps, check out my tutorial on homemade wine bottle planters. It’s a great way to repurpose those empty wine bottles you have lying around, and they’re a stylish way to plant herbs!

Beeswax Only Vs. Beeswax, Pine Rosin And Jojoba Oil

There are a whole host of tutorials that just use beeswax to make food wraps. I wanted the beeswax-only wraps to work, but they’re just…meh. They’re not very sticky, so they won’t cover bowls or jars well unless you also employ a rubber band. They’re also pretty stiff and prone to crack. 

Don’t get me wrong, I’ll still put the beeswax-only wraps to use. But I just want my wraps to work harder. 

If you’re going to go to the trouble of making your own beeswax wraps, I highly recommend adding pine rosin and jojoba oil to your mix. These additions perform a special kind of voodoo magic that brings the whole thing together beautifully. 

The jojoba oil adds suppleness and pliability to the wraps reducing the cracking tendency of beeswax. 

As one might assume, the pine rosin gives the wraps their tackiness so that they can adhere to themselves and any bowl, jar or container you cover.  

White Bowl Covered With Maroon Beeswax Wrap.

Caring For Your Homemade Beeswax Wraps

Beeswax wraps are easy to care for by following some pretty straightforward guidelines. 

After use, beeswax wraps can be washed in cold water with a mild soap. Hang to dry. It is important to avoid washing in hot water to avoid running the risk of melting the wraps. 

I recommend storing your beeswax wraps in a cool, dry area such as in a drawer or cabinet. Due to their stickiness, they will attract particles floating around in the air if left out in the open. 

Because beeswax wraps can’t be washed in hot water, these wraps should not be used to cover raw meat or seafood. Also, it is best to avoid storing high acidity foods with beeswax wraps. 

If left out in the heat or direct sunlight, you do run the risk of melting your beeswax wraps so I advise against leaving your lunchbox in the car.

Blue, Flowered Beeswax Wrap Hanging On Clothesline Next to Other Wraps With Plants In Background.

What To Do With Homemade Beeswax Wraps That Are Past Their Prime

If properly stored and cared for, homemade beeswax wraps will last roughly a year. 

They can be refreshed by adding some additional beeswax, sandwiching between layers of parchment paper and ironing to melt and disperse the beeswax. I always save any wax I have leftover from making beeswax wraps to use when my wraps need a facelift. 

You can also give them a little pick me up by placing them in a 200 degree Fahrenheit oven with some more beeswax. Once melted, spread around with a paintbrush and repeat as needed. 

Since I rather enjoy the process of making beeswax wraps, once the year mark approaches, I generally set out to make new wraps. 

These homemade beeswax wraps are biodegradable, so I generally cut them up and add them to my compost pile when they’re past their prime. 

Retired beeswax wraps also make effective fire starters.

Folded Beeswax Wraps In Basket With Plants In Background.

How To Fold A Beeswax Wrap Into A Snack Pouch

Admittedly, we still keep plastic bags in the house (I especially love using them to freeze soups), but we wash and reuse them whenever possible. Reusing plastic bags in conjunction with the incorporation of beeswax wraps into the rotation has notably reduced the amount of plastic baggies we go through.  

One of the most significant ways to use beeswax wraps is to fold into a pouch for snacks or sandwiches. Just fold the wrap into an envelope and you have a fancy little packet ready for filling. 

Square wraps work best for this fold, but I use my rectangular wraps as well. 

Start by laying flat with the backside of the fabric facing up. 

Fold one corner over to the opposite corner creating a triangle. 

With the fold side of the triangle down, fold the left corner over roughly halfway. 

Then fold the right corner over roughly halfway and tuck into the pocket created by the left corner fold. 

Someone Folding Square Beeswax Wrap Into Triangle.
Someone Folding a Corner of Triangle Over On Beeswax Wrap To Make A Snack Pouch.
Someone Folding Opposite Corner of Beeswax Wrap To Create Snack Pouch.
Someone Tucking One Corner of Triangle Into Opposite Corner to Create Beeswax Snack Pouch.

Now you have a nifty little pouch to fill with snacks or, if using a large enough wrap, a sandwich. 

To close, just fold or roll the top down, and you’re ready to hit the road armed with snacks.

Someone Holding Snack Pouch Made From Beeswax Wrap With Other Beeswax Wraps In Background.
Someone Holding A Beeswax Snack Pouch With Snacks Inside. Other Beeswax Wraps In Background.

Some Notes On Homemade Beeswax Wraps

  • Don’t be afraid to play with the ratios of the ingredients to pin down the beeswax wrap that works best for you. I went with a 4-2-1 ratio. These wraps are very sticky in the beginning and do have a tendency to leave a residue on things they come in contact with. The stickiness does calm down over time, but if that is something that bothers you, reduce the pine rosin in the recipe. 
  • If you have some leftover residue on your dishes from the wraps, rub a little coconut oil on the sticky area and then wash with soap and water. The coconut oil easily removes the tacky residue.
  • I have seen recipes substituting the jojoba oil for coconut oil or avocado oil. I stick with jojoba oil because it has a longer shelf life compared to other oils. I’ve also taken to using jojoba oil for my skin and hair, so I keep it handy. But I would love to hear about your experience if you’ve tried another oil!
  • I used white patterned fabric for some of my homemade beeswax wraps, and they yellowed during the process. I suspect the pine rosin and/or the applied heat caused this reaction. I don’t mind it, and still use these wraps without issue, but I recommend avoiding white fabric when making these. 

| Related

Beeswax Wraps Hanging From Clothesline With Clothes Pins.
White Bowl Covered With Maroon Beeswax Wrap.
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5 from 4 votes

How To Make Homemade Beeswax Wraps

Prep Time5 mins
Active Time30 mins
Total Time35 mins
Yield: 12 square feet of fabric

Materials

  • 12 square feet 100% cotton fabric amount of fabric will vary based on amount of mixture applied to each piece of fabric
  • 1 cup cosmetic grade beeswax pellets
  • ½ cup pine rosin powdered
  • ¼ cup jojoba oil

Instructions

  • Disclaimer: Please endeavor to work safely when making homemade beeswax wraps. Both beeswax and pine rosin are highly flammable, and should not be left unattended. Adequate precautions should be taken to prevent fires and burns.
  • Begin by washing and drying the cotton fabric. Cut into the desired sizes and shapes with pinking shears.
  • I like to prep my fabric pieces by laying out an old towel, placing parchment paper on top of it, then my fabric. It’s also a good idea to lay newspaper out around your work area in case of spills.
  • Add the beeswax, jojoba oil and pine rosin to the aluminum can. Fill your saucepan about halfway with water, place the can in the saucepan to create a double boiler system. Heat until you reach a steady simmer.
  • Allow the beeswax mixture to melt, stirring consistently with a skewer or popsicle stick. The pine resin takes a bit to melt, so this part requires some patience. I recommend staying very close to the mixture as you wait for it to melt to ensure the can doesn’t tip over as the ingredients are flammable.
  • Once your mixture has melted together, carefully remove from heat and apply the mixture to your prepared wraps with an old paintbrush working from the center and brushing out toward the edges.
  • You’ll want to completely cover your fabric with the mixture but not saturate it.
  • Then place another piece of parchment paper on top of the fabric and iron. Allow to cool for about a minute, then remove the top layer of parchment and peel the fabric from the bottom layer of parchment. Hang to finish drying.
  • If there are bare spots after ironing, paint some more of the beeswax mixture on the fabric and repeat the ironing process.
  • Voila! Homemade, eco-friendly, biodegradable beeswax wraps!

Notes

  • Don’t be afraid to play with the ratios of the ingredients to pin down the beeswax wrap that works best for you. I went with a 4-2-1 ratio. These wraps are very sticky in the beginning and do have a tendency to leave a residue on things they come in contact with. The stickiness does calm down over time, but if that is something that bothers you, reduce the pine resin in the recipe. 
 
  • If you have some leftover residue on your dishes from the wraps, wrap a little coconut oil on the sticky area and then wash with soap and water. The coconut oil easily removes the tackiness.
 
  • I have seen recipes substituting jojoba oil for coconut oil or avocado oil. I stick with jojoba oil because it has a longer shelf life compared to other oils. 
 
  • I used white patterned fabric for my first homemade beeswax wraps, and they yellowed during the process. I suspect the pine resin and/or the applied heat caused this reaction. I don’t mind it, and still use these wraps without issue, but I recommend avoiding white fabric when making these. 

If you enjoyed this tutorial, be sure to share the love on social media and subscribe below to stay connected. 

Your support is appreciated! 

If you’re searching for another environmentally-friendly DIY, be sure to check out my post on How To Make Self-Watering Wine Bottle Planters!

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16 Comments
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Jaime
5 months ago

This is so cute! Thanks for sharing!

Jelissa
5 months ago

This is really cool! How do you feel about buying all that beeswax with rumors of bees going extinct?

Cayla Holleman
5 months ago

5 stars
I love that you can make the cutest designs with these! This would be so cute for picnic!

Karen Kasberg
5 months ago

5 stars
This is so cool! I have purchased beeswax covers in the past and yes, they can be pricey. I will be pinning this to give this a try later. Thanks for sharing.

Kristin
5 months ago

5 stars
I’ve had beeswax wraps in my Amazon cart for weeks! I didn’t even realize it was possible to make them! Thank you so much for this. I can’t wait to have a crafty day making these myself. Off to Michael’s I go to get the supplies!

Courtney
5 months ago

5 stars
I absolutely love this! I hate using plastic, especially for one-time use! Thanks for this tutorial!

Abby
5 months ago

I had no idea this was something that could be done! What an informative post. I also love the photos, very visual person here so that was super helpful! Thank you for this. 🙂

Christine
5 months ago

Nice! Really appreciate the tip of using Beeswax Only Vs. Beeswax, Pine Rosin And Jojoba Oil. Thanks for sharing.